May 17, 2020

[VIDEO] Biggest and Baddest Mining Equipment

Video
Machinery
mining equipment
excavator
Admin
1 min
[VIDEO] Biggest and Baddest Mining Equipment
For people unrelated to the mining industry, the term “mining equipment” often conjures up thoughts of bulldozers and small-scale excavators...

For people unrelated to the mining industry, the term “mining equipment” often conjures up thoughts of bulldozers and small-scale excavators. That couldn’t be further from the truth.

The mining industry is full of lean, mean, giant machines. The sector employs some of the largest machines the world has ever seen, and they’re only getting bigger. From trucks and excavators to draglines and scoopers, we reveal the biggest and baddest mining machinery in the mining industry.

Largest excavator

The world’s largest mining machine is the Bagger 293 bucket wheel excavator. This piece of machinery, which looks straight out of a Transformers movie, is seriously frightening. Thank god it doesn't have legs! 

At 3 4.9 feet tall, 738.2 feet long and weighing roughly 31.3 million pounds, the 293 is beyond massive. In addition to needing five people to opearte, the Bagger 293 has the ability to move 8.510 million cubic feet of earth per day.

Largest dump truck

In terms of large mining dump trucks, the Belaz 75710 hits the jackpot. This behemoth of a truck  is 20.6 meters long, 8.16 meters high and 9.87 meters wide, providing a payload capacity of 496 tons. Launched in 2013, the ultra-heavy dump truck features two 16-cylinder turbocharged diesel engines with a power output of 2,300 HP.

 

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Jul 17, 2021

Coal India Secures First-Of-Its-Kind Digital Deal

digitalmining
coalindia
Accenture
Sustainability
2 min
Coal India Limited has secured a new deal with Accenture Solutions to consult on enhancing mining performance and production through a digital endeavour

Coal India Limited (CIL) has appointed Accenture Solutions to digitally transform seven of its open-cast mines as the company strives to improve performance and increase coal production. Accenture is due to lay down digitalisation groundwork until March 2022.

The deal aims to increase coal production by 100 million tonnes (MT) by the end of FY’23. Once the minimum quantity has been surpassed, an agreed sum will be paid to the consultant for every additional sum of coal produced. This success fee will only be paid on the procurement of the minimum assured quantity. 

The move will see heavy earth moving machinery (HEMM) fitted with digital sensors to monitor performance efficiency at all levels. Additionally, modern data analytic techniques aim to increase mine productivity and project monitoring through functional system management and effective observation. 

An Exciting Venture For Global Mining

CIL, which aims to provide energy security in an environmentally and socially sustainable manner, hopes the move will help transform the entire business of mining operations and ensure higher volumes of coal are acquired at a lower cost. 

“This is a first of its kind initiative by the company utilising digitalisation to ramp up coal output,” CIL has said. 

A Digital Step Towards Enhanced Performance

Digitalisation is expected to take place at open-cast mines in Kusmunda, Gevra, Dipka of Southern Eastern Coalfields (SECL), Migahi, Jayant, Dudhichua, and Khadia of Northern Coalfields (NCL). Nearly 32% (188 MT) of CIL’s 596 MT output in FY’21 was accounted for by the seven selected mines. However, this new deal is set to see a large increase following the subsequent digital changes due to be made.  

“Learning from the outcome and success of this model, we may replicate it in our other large mines,” says CIL, optimistic about the future following the modernisation of their mining. 

It is expected that the move will help address roadblocks and guarantee corrective measures are put into place, ensuring the company is able to move forward with its aim of increasing output whilst remaining sustainable and eco-friendly.

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