Dec 2, 2017

Anglo American: fighting the joint epidemics of HIV and TB in South Africa

Dale Benton
3 min
As part of our look at World AIDS day 2017,  Stefaan Van der Borght, Global Head of Health, Anglo Ame...

As part of our look at World AIDS day 2017,  Stefaan Van der Borght, Global Head of Health, Anglo American discusses how the mining company fights the joint epidemics of HIV and TB in South Africa - Part 2

Read part 1 here

 

The work isn’t over yet – looking to 2030

The progress in fighting these epidemics has not been achieved by one government or one organisation alone. It is by working together, across industries, governments, businesses and civil society, that a real difference is made. But it cannot stop here – there are still 37 million people worldwide infected with HIV. In December 2016, we signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) as part of our reinvigorated role in the global fight against AIDS. Ending AIDS by 2030 is a Sustainable Development Goal and if this is going to be achieved, collaboration and action must continue and TB must be fought alongside HIV, to maximise the chance of ridding affected communities and people of these diseases.

Case study: INH programme in Rustenburg

During 2016, Anglo American’s Platinum division expanded its single-dose isoniazid (INH), an antibiotic used to treat TB, prevention therapy programme.

Following a full review of its TB and HIV management programmes, the Platinum unit has achieved a significant improvement in performance across incidence rates, disease management programme enrolment and treatment uptake. The review examined the people, processes and technologies used, and the resulting plan included: increasing staff numbers and training opportunities; managing seamless referrals and the introduction of red flags to trigger follow up of defaulters and those not enrolled on the disease management programme; the use of the Tuberculin test, designed to indicate if people have ever been exposed to TB, and the availability of INH prophylactic therapy.

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De Beers, Anglo American sign MoU to propel Botswanan economy and growth

Between January 2015 and November 2016, the cumulative number of ‘high risk’ employees started on INH prophylaxis was 5,522. The follow-up of individuals with known HIV-positive status who had not joined the programme saw just over 96% of people enrolling. Between 2013 and October 2016, the registration on HIV disease management increased by 18% and enrolment on ART increased significantly by 52%. Of the individuals on the TB disease management programme, the proportion of ART uptake increased. This demonstrates how the uptake for treatment for TB has indirectly led to more people receiving ART, combatting the two illnesses at the same time and having more impact.

This treatment programme has resulted in a decrease in TB incidence over the past three years – with a reduction in both pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB. Against the backdrop of the ‘test and treat’ treatment guideline and the 90-90-90 target set by UNAIDS, Anglo American’s Platinum business is continuing to work towards meeting these new targets. In addition, it is strengthening its partnerships with district health facilities and other social partners to ensure that any gaps in the prevention, treatment and care space are identified and managed.

 

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May 11, 2021

Gerald Group resolves iron ore dispute with Sierra Leone

Gerald Group
SL Mining
Iron ore
Marampa iron ore mine
2 min
Gerald Group, the US commodity broker, set to restart iron ore shipments from Marampa mine with subsidiary SL Mining

Gerald Group, the US commodity trader, will pay Sierra Leone $20mn and cede a 10% stake in an iron ore project as part of the resolution to a nearly two-year dispute that led to the shutdown of production, the two sides revealed.

SL Mining

Gerald's wholly-owned subsidiary SL Mining filed for arbitration in August 2019 over a royalty payment dispute and suspended the Marampa mine the following month. Sierra Leone's government responded by cancelling its mining licence. 

As part of the agreement signed on Friday, Sierra Leone will take a non-dilutable 10% stake in a new company that will replace SL Mining and resume operations at Marampa by June 1, Gerald said in a statement.

Iron Ore

Gerald will make two $10mn payments this year and will have the immediate right to ship its current stockpile of about 707,000 tonnes of iron ore, it said.

Both sides will withdraw their legal claims before the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), the statement added.

Gerald’s chairman and CEO Craig Dean commented: "I am delighted that we have been able to resolve our differences and have a fresh start and new beginning with the government of Sierra Leone."

SL Mining

Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's Mines Minister Timothy Kabba told a news conference on Tuesday that the agreement was a milestone for the country.

"Whatever the pain we may have borne or dreaded throughout these two years ... this outcome justifies our action," he said.

Gerald estimates that Marampa holds about 1 billion tonnes of iron ore with a potential lifespan of 30 years.

Gerald Group

Back in 2019, Dean spoke with Mining about the development of Marampa and commented: "SL Mining offers a substantial opportunity for Gerald Group as our Marampa mine in Sierra Leone is set to deliver six million tonnes of high-grade iron ore during its operational life. If you analyse the iron ore market it has transformed, even from a couple of years ago when prices were very low. Now prices have stabilised we’re in a favourable position with our first shipments leaving for China.

"Our goal is to make ‘Marampa Blue’ an internationally recognised premium grade iron ore brand. We intend to expand the delivery of high-grade 65% iron ore concentrate to markets in Europe and Africa.”

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