May 17, 2020

Best Mining Companies to Work for in Latin America

Latin America
Companies
Great Place to Work
Best companie
Admin
2 min
#3 Maestranza Diesel
With the participation of the most important multinational companies in Central America and the Caribbean, Great Place to Work® Unveils the 2014 ed...

   With the participation of the most important multinational companies in Central America and the Caribbean, Great Place to Work® Unveils the 2014 edition of the Best Companies to Work For in the mining industry.

   In forming the list of Best Companies to Work For, the opinion of employees is key, since it represents two thirds of the final score. The remaining third consists on the Culture Audit used for understanding and evaluating the organization’s policies and practices, as well as comments from reviewers.

   "We have found that maintaining a great place to work beneficially impacts the quality of life for employees and their families, in business and in the improvement of our societies. Therefore, we are proud of the performance that organizations in Central America and the Caribbean have made in compromise with the most valuable thing they have: their employees," said Antonio Ono, Vice President of Great Place to Work in Central America and the Caribbean.

3. Maestranza Diesel

466 employees

www.md.cl

Industry: Manufacturing and production of metals

Country: Chile

1st Year on a Latin American Great Place to Work list: 2006

2: Hocol

194 employees

www.hocol.com

Industry: Exploration and production

Country: Colombia

1st Year on a Latin American Great Place to Work list: 2012

1: SAMA

695 employees

www.sama.com.br

Industry: Mining and Quarrying

Country: Brazil

1st Year on a Latin American Great Place to Work list: 2003

 

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Jun 18, 2021

Unmanned train to allow Vale to reopen iron ore plant

Vale
Iron ore
Timbopeba
Autonomous trains
2 min
Vale’s Timbopeba iron ore plant will be able to resume operations near the Xingu dam through the use of autonomous trains

Brazilian miner Vale SA will be able to resume operations at its Timbopeba iron ore dry processing plant in up to two months thanks to the use of an unmanned train, the company said in a statement this week.

Vale - Timbopeba iro ore plant

With the train, Timbopeba will be able to operate at least at 80% of its capacity of 33,000 tonnes of iron ore “fines” per day, reports Reuters.

Vale was forced to shut down the plant in the Alegria mine complex recently after labor authorities in Minas Gerais state banned activities close to the Xingu dam due to concerns of a risk of collapse.

Autonomous trains

Vale said access by workers and vehicles continues to be suspended in the flood zone of the dam due to the ban even though it remains at emergency level 2, which means there no imminent risk of rupture.

But some workers are allowed entry under strict security precautions and they will get the unmanned train going once it has been tested, which would take between one and two months, the company said.

The unmanned train will travel automatically along 16 kilometers (10 miles) of track operated by a system that can control the speed and activate the brakes, Vale said.

Vale announces first ore at Voisey’s Bay mine extension

Vale has reached the milestone of first ore production at the Reid Brook deposit at the Voisey’s Bay mine expansion project in Northern Labrador, Canada - recognised as the safest mine in Canada.

Vale Timbopeba

 

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