May 17, 2020

[IMAGES] Rio Tinto and Chevron extend deals with Tempo Australia

Australia
Rio Tinto
Tempo
Pilbara Region
Admin
3 min
Tempo received an extension with Rio Tinto at its 353 million ton per annum Cape Lambert Port B Expansion Project in the Pilbara region of Western Australia.
As our sister site Business Review Australia reported, Aussie resource services company Tempo Australia recently secured new contract extensions with mi...

As our sister site Business Review Australia reported, Aussie resource services company Tempo Australia recently secured new contract extensions with mining behemoth Rio Tinto and energy giant Chevron that will total about $50 million.

Tempo received an extension with Rio Tinto at its 353 million ton per annum Cape Lambert Port B Expansion Project in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. The $13.4 million contract will see Tempo provide structural, mechanical and piping miscellaneous works as well as commissioning support for Rio Tinto’s expansion work at the port.

RELATED TOPIC: Australia is primed to cash in on uranium

It is Tempo’s first major contract with Rio Tinto.

“We’re pleased to have been given the opportunity to execute the miscellaneous SMP and commissioning support works at Cape Lambert,” said Tempo general manager Daniel Hibbs.

Tempo reported sales receipts of $15.3 million and operating cash flows of $1.9 million during the June 2015 quarter. Established in 2011 to provide Structural Mechanical Piping (SMP) services to the mining, oil and gas sectors, Tempo works with clients to execute projects safely and deliver them both on time and within its budget.

RELATED TOPIC: Rio Tinto aims to cut costs by $1 billion but how?

In addition, the change to Tempo’s existing sub-contract at Chevron’s Gorgon Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)Project on Barrow Island in Western Australia refer to the arrangement of Managed Structural, Mechanical and Piping, Electrical & Instrumentation (SMPE&I) craft labour for construction, pre-commissioning and commissioning services to the Mechanical, Electrical and Instrumentation (ME&I) contractor on the project.

 “The award of these major contract extensions in what continues to be challenging market conditions demonstrates and showcases Tempo’s ability to provide our portfolio of bluechip clients with solutions based on our core values of productivity, performance and safety, and we look forward to continuing to build long term relationships with these key clients,” said Carmelo Bontempo, executive chairman of Tempo Australia.

RELATED TOPIC: LNG surpassing coal and iron ore in Australia

Tempo’s secured requisition for additional personnel to stay on Barrow Island will increase its workforce under the company’s contract despite how difficult it is for workers to get beds on the island. However, Chevron has now approved the requisition for additional bedspace.

With the secured variations, nearly 400 Tempo employees are now on site at the Gorgon Project. When the contract was initially granted in May 2015, there were 100 members of personnel on the grounds.

The $55 million project is about 90 per cent complete, but is still months behind schedule. Chevron’s goal was to ship its first LNG cargo by the end of 2015, but acknowledged it may not happen until 2016.

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Apr 22, 2021

Lynas revenue jumps 21% as rare earth prices jump

Lynas
RareEarth
WindTurbines
electricvehicles
2 min
Lynas Rare Earths sees revenue boost as selling prices for the key metals hit record highs amid strong demand for neodymium and praseodymium (NdPr)

Australian miner Lynas Rare Earths posted a 20.6% rise in revenue in the March quarter as selling prices for the key metals it mines hit record highs amid strong demand, particularly for neodymium and praseodymium (NdPr).

NdPr

NdPr is used in magnets for electric vehicles and windfarms, in consumer goods like smartphones, and in military equipment such as jet engines and missile guidance systems.

The company said it plans to maintain production at 75% however, as it seeks to continue to meet covid-19 safety protocols and grapples with shipping difficulties. Shares in Lynas fell 6.1% after the results.

“They have faced a few logistics issues, and it would be good to know when they are going to start lifting their utilisation rates a bit,” said portfolio manager Andy Forster of Argo Investments in Sydney.

“Pricing has been pretty strong although it may have peeled back a bit recently. I still think the medium, long-term outlook is pretty good for their suite of products.”

Lynas post ed revenue of A$110mn ($85.37mn) for the three months to the end of March, up from A$91.2mn a year earlier as prices soared.

Rare Earths

It said its full product range garnered average selling prices of A$35.5/kg during the March quarter, up from $23.7 in the first half of the financial year. “While the persistence of the covid crisis, especially in Europe, calls for careful forecasts for our business ahead, we see the rare earth market recovering very quickly,” said Lynas, the world’s largest rare earths producer outside China.

Freight demand has spiked during the pandemic, while the blockage of the Suez Canal in March delayed a shipment to April.

Lynas’ output of 4,463 tonnes of rare earth oxide (REO) during the quarter was marginally lower than 4,465 tonnes from a year earlier.

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