Sep 29, 2014

Top 10: Diamond Mines in the World

Admin
4 min
Top 10: Diamond Mines in the World
10.) Botuobinskaya (Russia) Located in the Yakutia region of Russia, the Botuobinskaya diamond mine is estimated to contain...

10.) Botuobinskaya (Russia)

Located in the Yakutia region of Russia, the Botuobinskaya diamond mine is estimated to contain roughly 70 million carats. The mine, which is scheduled to commence production in 2015, is owned and operated by Nyurba mining and processing division of ALROSA.

The company began the first phase of the stripping operation in late 2012. The operation will last three years with mining operations expected to begin in the fourth quarter of 2015. The Botuobinskaya mine will produce 1.5 million carats of diamonds annually for more than 40 years.

9.) Orapa (Africa)

As the world’s largest diamond mine by area, the Orapa diamond mine is located 240km west of Francistown city in Central Botswana. The open-pit mine is estimated to contain 85.7 million carats of diamond reserves.

Orapa commenced production in 1971 and underwent expansion in 1999 to double its previous capacity. Owned and operated by Debswana, a partnership betweenthe De Beers Company and the government of Botswana, the site is the oldest of the four diamond mines operated by Debswana.

8.) Jwaneng (Africa)

Another major diamond mine is Botswana is the Jwaneng site, which is located 160 miles south-west of Gaborone in south central Botswana. The mine, which has been in production since 1982, is another partnership owned and operated site by the De Beers Company and the Government of Botswana.

Regarded as the “richest” diamond mine in the world in terms of value, the Jwaneng mine is estimated to contain roughly 88 million carats of diamond reserves. Since 2010, the mine has undergone a major expansion (Cut-8) to extend the mine’s life cycle until 2025.

7.) Grib (Russia)

Located in the north-western part of Russia, Grib is an open-pit diamond mine estimated to contain over 98 million carats. The mine is expected to become the largest diamond mine in Russia in terms of size.

The Grib mine is owned and operated by Lukoil through its subsidiary Arkhangelskgeoldobycha (AGD). With production commencing in June 2013, the site is planned to go underground after 16 years of open-pit operation.

Grib is the first new non-alluvial diamond mine to produce more than one million carats per year.

6.) Venetia (South Africa)

Owned and operated by De Beers, the Venetia diamond mine is estimated to contain more than 102 million carats. Located in the province of Limpopo in South Africa, the site is both an open-pit and underground mine producing roughly 3.066 million carats of diamonds in 2012.

With deposits consisting of 12 kimberlite pipes, the Venetia mine is the largest diamond producing mine in South Africa.

5.) Catoca (Africa)

Located in Angola, the Catoca is the fifth largest diamond mine in the world. Operated by Sociedade Mineira de Catoca, the mine is a joint venture with state-owned diamond company Endiama (32.8 percent), ALROSA (32.8 percent), China and state oil producer Sonangol (18 percent) and Odebrecht of Brazil (16.4 percent).

The mine is estimated to contain 130 million carats of mineable diamond. The Catoca mine accounted for 70 percent of Angola’s total diamond output.

4.) Argyle (Australia)

The Argyle mine in Western Australia is estimated to contain 140 million carats of diamond.

Owned and operated by Rio Tinto, the mine has been in production since 1983 with peak production expected to hit 20 million carats a year. The Argyle mine is currently transitioning from an open-pit mine to underground, becoming the first block cave mine in Western Australia.

The mine is expected to produce until 2020.

3.) Mir (Russia)

Before decommissioning in 2001, the Mir mine was the largest diamond mine in the world. Discovered in 1955, the Mir diamond mine is owned and operated by ALROSA and estimated to contain 141 million carats of diamonds.

Underground operations recommenced in 2009 and the site is expected to produce one million carats in 2014.

2.) Udachny (Russia)

One of many diamond mines owned by ALROSA, the Udachny mine in Russia is on pace to become the largest diamond mine in the world.

Located in the Yakutia region of Russia, Udachny is estimated to contain over 152 million carats of diamonds. Discovered in 1955, the mine is one of the deepest open-pit mines in the world, producing 10 million carats of diamonds a year.

1.) Jubilee (Russia)

Ranking number one on our list, the Jubilee diamond mine in Russia is the epitome of producing mines. The site is estimated to contain more than 153 million carats of recoverable diamonds, including 51 million carats of probably underground reserves.

Owned and operated by the Aikhal mining and processing division of state-owned ALROSA, the site is an open-pit mine operating at depths of 320 meters with expectations of eventually reaching 729 meters. In 2012, the Jubilee diamond mine produced 10.4 million carats of ore.

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Jan 30, 2019

Deloitte predicts industry transformation - Tracking the Trends 2019 report

Operations
Automation
Deloitte
Daniel Brightmore
3 min
Deloitte reveals top ten trends transforming mining in annual Tracking the Trends report
Deloitte has published the eleventh edition of its an...

Deloitte has published the eleventh edition of its annual report on the mining industry. Tracking the Trends identifies the top ten trends transforming the future of mining in 2019

The Deloitte report endeavours to provide the mining industry with insights it can leverage to support its continued quest for productivity, capital discipline, strategic development and sustainable growth.

Philip Hopwood, Deloitte’s Global Leader - Mining & Metals, commented: “It appears that the mining industry is poised for greater growth than it’s seen in a decade, but today’s market realities are very different than those of the past. We’re now dealing with geopolitical tensions in the form of trade wars and tariff concerns, as well as looming asset shortages. Rising commodity prices should fuel expansion, but could also result in a return of inflation and the costs that go with it, eventually eating into margins. 

Disruption and volatility has become the new normal and the pace of change is outpacing our ability to adapt. This makes it imperative for mining companies to clarify how they plan to drive value into the future and how they intend to respond when prices inevitably drop again.” 

Related stories:

EY survey finds losing 'licence to operate' is the biggest risk to the industry in 2019

Predicting the disruptors of tomorrow’s mining industry: Deloitte’s tracking the trends 2018

Renewables the key to energy cost savings and competitive edge says Deloitte

Here are the key messages provided by the 2019 report:

  • Disruption and volatilitymake it imperative for mining companies to clarify how they plan to drive value into the future and how they intend to respond when prices inevitably drop again. To thrive into the future, mining companies will need to challenge the status quo by soliciting a diversity of opinions and taking the risk to do things differently. 

 

  • Technology and artificial intelligence (AI) will play akey role, not only in helping companies envision future scenarios, but in identifying risks at an enterprise level and transforming the supply chain. Moreover, advances in finance platforms, sensor technology, autonomous vehicles, cloud- based solutions, and analytics are paving the way for the design of a digital mine. 

 

  • Understanding the needsand perceptions of people both inside and outside the organization will be critical. Companies must build amore diverse workplace and address succession planning, while fostering loyalty and retention among existing employees. At the same time companies must do more outreach to local communities, governments, and consumers so they can be more transparent and receptive. 

 

Top Ten Trends Transforming the Future of Mining:

  1. Rethinking mining strategy - Embedding the discipline to deliver measurable value across the cycle 
  2. The frontier of analytics and artifcial intelligenceMoving up the maturity curve 
  3. Managing risk in the digital era - Exploring a new approach to controls and risk management 
  4. Digitizing the supply chain - Why innovation requires integration 
  5. Driving sustainable shared social outcomes - Finding value beyond compliance 
  6. Exploring the water-energy nexus - Making the case for a systematic approach 
  7. Decoding capital projects - Learning from past mistakes
  8. Reimagining work, workers, and the workplace - A blueprint for the future 
  9. Operationalising diversity and inclusion programs - From theory to practice 
  10. Demanding provenanceEVs and battery minerals provoke the desire for provenance 

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