Sep 14, 2020

Gold Fields reviews approvals after Rio Tinto cave incident

Rio Tinto
Gold Fields
Pilbara
mining
Jonathan Campion
1 min
The miner will place more scrutiny on its Australian sites, following the blast that destroyed two Aborigine historical sites in Pilbara
The miner will place more scrutiny on its Australian sites, following the blast by a rival company that destroyed two Aborigine historical sites in Pilb...

It was announced on Friday that Rio Tinto’s CEO Jean-Sébastien Jacques and two other senior executives would resign in the wake of a blast carried out by the company in May, which blew up a gorge in Western Australia that showed signs of inhabitation over 45,000 years old. This has prompted its rival Gold Fields, which operates four gold mines in Western Australia including the Agnew and Granny Smith mines, to conduct a review into how it manages heritage sites.

Speaking to Reuters on Monday, a spokesman for Gold Fields, Sven Lunsche, commented: "As a result of the Rio incident, two months ago we initiated a review of previous legal approvals that each Australian site had received from the regulator”.

"We have also undertaken a review of the gaps identified in Gold Fields' heritage management processes as part of a critical control audit in late 2019, with a particular focus on relationships with Aboriginal stakeholders”.

While Gold Fields also has operations in Ghana, South Africa and Peru, Lunsche added that none of these mines are located near areas that are culturally sensitive. 

While Rio Tinto’s CEO Jean-Sébastien Jacques has agreed to resign, he will remain in post until March 2021, or until his successor is found. He will leave alongside the heads of Rio Tinto’s iron ore and corporate relations divisions. 

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May 13, 2021

Mining Profile: Gary Nagle, CEO, Glencore

Gary Nagle
Glencore
Mining CEO
Decarbonisation
3 min
Gary Nagle joined Glencore in 2000 progressing to head up its global coal operation. He will succeed Ivan Glasenberg as CEO in July 2021

Gary Nagle has spent his career in mining, across two decades, with Glencore – the Anglo-Swiss metals and mining company with a diverse global portfolio. Nagle is a one company man who has experienced the journey of the resources industry from boots on the ground to the boardroom. He will succeed Ivan Glasenberg as Glencore’s CEO in July 2021

Gary Nagle

Gary Nagle was born in South Africa in 1975 where he earned degrees in commerce and accounting from the University of Witwatersrand, before qualifying as a chartered accountant in 1999. Nagle joined Glencore in 2000 as an asset manager in the coal department. His rise was swift; by 2007 he was named chief executive of the company’s Colombian coal operation, Prodeco.

Following the acquisition of Xstrata in 2013, Nagle moved to run the company’s South Africa-focused alloy assets, before being named head of the company’s global coal assets portfolio in 2018

Building his career by rising through the ranks of Glencore’s coal department Nagles was considered the most likely to succeed Glasenberg due to his asset-focus; mining accounts for a growing share of Glencore’s revenue as it moves away from its origins as a pure trader.

Glencore’s Chairman, Tony Hayward, commented on the appointment: “Gary Nagle has held senior roles in coal and ferroalloys in Colombia, South Africa and Australia. He has been on the Board’s radar for more than several years and was selected following a succession process overseen by the Board. We are confident that he has the right skill set and qualities to lead the Glencore of tomorrow.”

Gary Nagle

Glencore

Ivan Glasenberg is retiring from his role as CEO after nearly 20 years at the helm of Glencore which saw him complete one of the largest mining mergers in history, with Xstrata. Looking back on his time at Glencore, the world’s largest commodities trader, Glasenberg reflected: “I am proud of the great company that we have built. Together, we have created one of the world’s largest diversified miners and marketers of commodities. Today, our diversified portfolio uniquely positions us to play an essential role in the global transition to a low-carbon economy.”

Glencore has announced plans to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 by reducing its direct and indirect carbon footprint by 40% by 2035.

Glasenberg has served as mentor to Nagle who has followed a similar career path at Glencore rising to the role of CEO via heading up the company’s global coal business.

Ivan Glasenberg

“I have worked with Gary since he joined the company twenty years ago,” recalled Glasenberg. “I have always regarded it as a critical part of my job to develop the next generation of leadership at Glencore and I am proud of the strong leadership team that we developed from which we were able to select Gary. I am confident that his leadership, along with the support of the management team, will enable Glencore to take advantage of the opportunities that lie ahead and be a strong custodian for my shareholding in the company.”

Looking ahead to the challenges awaiting him, Nagle was full of optimism: “I am grateful for the trust placed in me by the Board and honoured to be appointed CEO at such an exciting time for Glencore. We will continue to deliver value to our shareholders, while operating safely and responsibly.”

Nagle will relocate from Australia to Switzerland to take up his new role.

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